Last week I hosted a spoken word open mic and book launch in collaboration with my poetry students at AD.DAR Culture Center. The evening saw poets from all over the world read poetry in Arabic, Farsi, English, Turkish and so on, even though I was hosting it was so beautiful to see so many people come together and celebrate the written and spoken word and power of speech. Especially when so many of us are coming from broken homelands and countries where ours and so many others’ voices have been silenced.

We released a chapbook of some poems with help from our buddies at Spoken Word Istanbul also.

mother tongues

Here’s one of the poems.

At times I wonder the change I’ve been through

Though at times I wonder what things didn’t change too

And so on I lived

Unaware of my hidden flaws,

Unviewed by, but yet viewed by I,

So this trip goes on,

Unstoppable

Like a train going endlessly.

 Nawrus Almatar

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A week or so ago I was on Ujima Radio with my good pal Vanessa.

I’m phoning in but there’s two poems on there from ‘Giving Indian’ and it’s nice to test out new material so please tell me what you think.

You may listen to this phone in here

I also received a sample of an amazing illustration of one of my poems for a magazine which will be out soon.

It’s all very exciting.

 

Cogs been turning

April 9, 2013

I’m working on a show called -‘Giving Indian’ (working title)

It’s a spoken word show about being a girl wandering around India by yourself and the sorts of things you find. (Other than yourself of course).

It’s about 3 and a half about of 7 poems finished and will most certainly be ready to tour this summer.

Email me for bookings 🙂 lydiabeardmore@gmail.com

cc

Poets

June 5, 2012

Over the past few months I’ve been taking portraits for my latest photo project ‘Poets at Work’

As a spoken word artist/photographer photographing poets seemed like an obvious choice of project but my intentions behind this series were more about exploring a process that is largely undocumented and unexamined.

 As a young writer growing up idolising the cool factor of the writers working in Paris in the 20s and beat generation in the 50s. I’ve seen many a photo of Jack Keroac at the typewriter looking as badass as any rockstar.

In many ways, I consider performance poets to be the new rock stars of literature. They are entertaining, honest and in the most part accessible, yet all we see of them is immediate. Their work is presented to an audience in a theatrical manner. However honest and sincere the performance it is always easy to sit back and accept their work as talented showmanship and never consider the process behind the words.

It interests me to think that a poem performed with the confidence and grace many talenented poets possess could have been written under a duvet with a full ashtray and tears in the eyes of the poet. Just because poems are often performed in an extrovert manner doesn’t mean the idea wasn’t convinced in a more introverted and personal environment.

Similarly I find the process itself fasinating. How do people write?

With laptop, notebook, Dictaphone? In your home, library, train, coffee shop, the street?

During my project I have found more and more reason to document these poets. The way they write is not only fascinating but encourages to look closer at every piece of stationary, setting and cup of coffee in this world and their collective potential to inspire creation.

So far I have photographed 5 poets and am giving a sneak preview of my work so far.

Day 240

April 23, 2012

Sally J.

The latest in my poet project.

Day 317

February 6, 2012

Hi all!

I’ve been very slack/busy lately.

Mostly with work, poetry, more poetry, london, lentils, etc

I went on the lovely Lyrically Minded radio show last night for UJIMA radio.

Saying a few words, laughing, and sharing some songs and poems I hold close to my heart.

You can listen to it here and here (that’s part 1 and part 2)

I’ve also been getting ready for the upcoming markets (but that’s for tomorrows post)

Here’s a self portrait